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How many people have HIV and Aids

AIDS/HIV   HERPES   GONORRHEA
 
BREAST CANCER   PROSTATE CANCER   DIABETES   CIGARETTE SMOKING

How many people have HIV and AIDS

Worldwide: UNAIDS estimates that 47.3 million people have been infected with HIV since the start of the global epidemic (42.9 million adults and 4.4 million children under 15). An estimated 13.9 million people have died with AIDS since the epidemic began (10.7 million adults and 3.2 million children under 15).

As of December 1998, there were an estimated 33.4 million people living with HIV infection or AIDS (32.2 million adults and 1.2 million children under 15). An estimated 5.8 million new HIV infections occurred in 1998. This represents almost 16,000 new cases per day. During 1998, HIV-associated illnesses caused the deaths of an estimated 2.5 million people, including 900,000 women and 510,000 children under 15.

In the United States: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are between 650,000 and 900,000 people living with HIV. Through December 1998, a total of 688,200 cases of AIDS had been reported to the CDC; of this number, 410,800 persons (representing 60% of cases) have died.

For the latest U.S. AIDS Trends, click here. To download the most recent CDC HIV/AIDS Surveillance Reports, click here.

How safe is the U.S. blood supply? The U.S. blood supply is among the safest in the world. Nearly all people infected with HIV through blood transfusions received those transfusions before 1985, the year it became possible to test donated blood for HIV.

The Public Health Service has recommended a multifaceted approach to blood safety in the United States that includes stringent donor selection practices and the use of screening tests. Blood donations in the United States have been screened for antibody to HIV-1 since March 1985 and HIV-2 since June 1992. Blood and blood products that test positive for HIV are safely discarded and are not used for transfusion

An estimated one in 450,000 to one in 660,000 donations per year are infectious for HIV but are not detected by current antibody screening tests. In August of 1995 the FDA recommended that all donated blood and plasma also be screened for HIV-1 p24 antigen. Donor screening for p24 antigen is expected to reduce the number of otherwise undetected infectious donations by approximately 25 percent per year. The improvement of processing methods for blood products has also reduced the number of infections resulting in the use of these products. Currently the risk of infection with HIV in the United States through receiving a blood transfusion or through the use of blood products is extremely rare and has become progressively more infrequent, even in areas with high HIV prevalence rates.

How many people in the U.S. has H.I.V.?

It is estimated that more than one million people are living with HIV in the USA and that more than half a million have died after developing AIDS.

HIV statistics reported in the USA are currently only available for 37 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting. AIDS statistics include all 50 states, the District of Columbia and five U.S. dependent areas. For more explanation, see the 'Interpreting HIV and AIDS statistics for the USA' section towards the end of this page.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that at the end of 2007, there were 599,819 people living with a diagnosis of HIV infection in the 37 states and five U.S. dependent areas. However, the total number of people living with an HIV infection in the U.S. is thought to be around 1.1 million.1 The discrepancy between these figures is due to several factors, including:

  • confidential name-based reporting of HIV diagnoses has not yet been implemented in all states;
  • anonymous tests, including home tests, are excluded from case reports;
  • and one in every five people living with HIV has not even had their infection diagnosed, let alone reported.2

During 2008, there were an estimated 42,439 new diagnoses of HIV infection in the 37 states and five dependent areas. Adult or adolescent males accounted for nearly three-quarters of new HIV diagnoses, more than two-thirds of whom were infected through male-to-male sexual contact. Heterosexual contact accounted for 15% of new infections among men and 84% among women. Injecting drug use was the transmission route in 9% of male and 15% of female diagnoses in 2008. In 2008 blacks/African Americans made up an estimated 50% of new diagnoses, whites 28%, and Hispanics/Latinos 19%. HIV was diagnosed in an estimated 182 children (<13 years at diagnosis) in 2008, all but 41 became infected through mother-to-child transmission.

AIDS diagnoses among children

An estimated 3,992 children (<13 years at diagnosis) were living with an AIDS diagnosis in 2007. The vast majority of these children acquired HIV through mother-to-child transmission. During 2008 there were an estimated 41 AIDS diagnoses among children, compared to 195 in 1999 and 896 in 1992. The decline in paediatric AIDS incidence is associated with a significant increase in HIV testing among pregnant women and the use of antiretroviral drugs to prevent mother-to-child transmission.

Deaths among people diagnosed with AIDS

In 1981, the first cases of what is now known as AIDS were reported in the U.S. During the 1980s there was a rapid increase in the number of reported AIDS cases and AIDS deaths. Cases peaked with the 1993 expansion of the case definition,3 and then declined. The most dramatic drops in both cases and deaths began in 1996, with the widespread use of combination antiretroviral therapy.

People with AIDS are now surviving longer and are contributing to a steady increase in the overall number of people living with AIDS. This trend will continue as long as the number of new diagnoses exceeds the number of people dying each year.

The number of deaths of persons with an AIDS diagnosis has stabilised in recent years at around 17,000-18,000 per year. (Deaths of persons with an AIDS diagnosis may be due to any cause).

Since the beginning of the epidemic, an estimated 597,499 people with AIDS have died in the U.S.

 

What is AIDS? What causes AIDS   How Long Does It Take For HIV to cause AIDS
     
How can I tell if I am infected with HIV   How Does HIV make someone sick
     
Where can I get tested for HIV infection   Can pre-cum and semen fluids contain HIV
     

How long after possible exposure should I get tested for HIV

 

If I am HIV negative does that mean that my partner is HIV negative

     
What If I Test HIV Positive  

I'm HIV positive.  Where can I go for information about treatments

     
How Many People Have HIV and AIDS   How safe is the United States Blood Supply
     
Where Did HIV Come From  

Why is CDC recommending that all pregnant women be tested for HIV

     

Can a women give HIV to a man during vaginal intercourse

  Can I get HIV from Oral Sex
     

How effective is Latex Condoms in preventing HIV

  Can Oil be used as a lubricant with Condoms
     

Whats the connection between HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases

  Can I get HIV from Kissing
     

Should I be concerned about getting infected while playing sports

 

Can I get HIV from shaking hands, hugging, using a toilet

     
Can I get infected with HIV from mosquitoes  

What does CDC recommend for prevention of transmission of HIV through intra-venous drugs

     

Influenza Symptoms/The Flu

Influenza Symptoms Be Aware of Common Flu Symptoms Diagnosing The Flu
Know The Risk From The Flu People May Have Different Reactions from the Flu Know How The Flu Spreads
Best Protection Against The Flu The Flu Shot The Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine
Related Information What Is The Flu Shot Who Should Get The Flu Shot
People At High Risk From Complications from the Flu People Who Live With Or Care For Those At High Risk From Complications From Flu Use of the Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine
Who Should Get The Flu Shot How Effective Is The Flu Shot What Are The Risk From Getting The Flu Shot

Liposuction

What Is Liposuction?   Who Performs Liposuction?   How Can I Find The Right Doctor?
         
What Does The FDA Regulate   What Are The Risk Associated With Liposuction?   Liposuction Glossary


 HIV / AIDS

What Is Aids   How long does it take for HIV to become Aids
     
How can I tell if I am infected with Aids   How does HIV make someone sick
     
Where can I get tested for HIV   Can pre-cum and semen fluid contain HIV
     
How long after possible exposure should I get tested for HIV   If I am HIV negative does that mean that my partner is HIV negative
     
What if I test HIV positive   I'm HIV positive.. Where can I go for treatment
     
How many people have HIV and Aids   How safe is the United States Blood Supply
     
Where did HIV come from   Why is CDC recommending that all pregnant women be tested for HIV
     
Can a women give HIV to a man during Intercourse   Can I get HIV from Oral Sex
     
How effective is Latex Condoms in preventing HIV   Can Oil be used as a lubricant with Condoms
     
What's the connection between HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases   Can I get HIV from Kissing
     
Should I be concerned about getting infected while playing sports   Can I get HIV from shaking hands, hugging, using a toilet
     
Can I get infected with HIV from Mosquitoes   What does CDC recommend for prevention of transmission of HIV through Intra-venous drugs

 

 

Prostate Cancer

What is the Prostate   What test will my Doctor order
     
What are Prostate problems   How is BPH treated
     
What is Prostatitis   Is TURP the same as removing the Prostate
     
What is Prostate enlargement or BPH   What is the side effects of Prostate treatment
     
Is BPH a serious diseases   Hope through research
     
Is BPH a sign of cancer   Prostate problem glossary
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 

Breast Cancer

 Breast Cancer

Breast is the most common type of cancer among women in this country (other than skin cancer). The number of new cases of breast cancer in women was estimated to be about 212,600 in 2003.

This National Cancer Institute (NCI) booklet (NIH Publication Number is 03-1556) has important information about breast cancer. It discusses possible causes, screening, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery. It also has information to help women with breast cancer cope with the disease.

Breast Cancer in Men

Each year, about 1,300 men in this country learn they have breast cancer. Much of the information in this booklet applies to men with breast cancer.

More information about breast cancer in men is available on NCI's Web site at http://www.cancer.gov/ and from NCI's Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER

The Breasts

The breasts are glands that can make milk. Each breast sits on chest muscles that cover the ribs.

Each breast is divided into 15 to 20 sections called lobes. Lobes contain many smaller lobules. Lobules contain groups of tiny glands that can produce milk. Milk flows from the lobules through thin tubes called ducts to the nipple. The nipple is in the center of a dark area of skin called the areola. Fat fills the spaces between the lobules and ducts.

 

 

METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA)

SUPER BUG

What Is MRSA   Who Is Susceptible To MRSA Infection   What Are The Symptoms of MRSA
Can MRSA Be Treated   How Long Does MRSA Infections Last   Where Is MRSA Found and How Does It Spread
How Is The Transmission of MRSA Prevented   Hand Washing   Masking
Gowning   Patient Care Equipment   Handling of Laundry

What Is Mesothelioma

What Is Mesothelioma Plearul Mesothelioma Peritoneal Mesothelioma Benign Mesothelioma

 


Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and is a major cause of disability. Almost 700,000 people die of heart disease in the U.S. each year. That is about 29% of all U.S. deaths. Heart disease is a term that includes several more specific heart conditions. The most common heart disease in the United States is coronary heart disease, which can lead to heart attack.

The risk of coronary heart disease can be reduced by taking steps to prevent and control those adverse factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease and heart attack. Additionally, knowing the signs and symptoms of heart attack, calling 911 right away, and getting to a hospital are crucial to the most positive outcomes after having a heart attack. People who have had a heart attack can also work to reduce their risk of future events.